Hackerlab

There are more and more talks of open or citizen science. For the moment, the main focus is on the publishing system and the way to remove it from the hands of a bit too greedy professional publishers. Two other aspects are the experimentation and numerical science, two money eaters of first class. There is a lot of to say about publishing and numerical science, but I want to focus today on the experimental part and how the maker movement is about to “make” things change in science, provided that we address the right type of issue.

We don’t need to be a fortune-teller to foresee that giant experiments like LHC or ITER or NIF will absorb more and more of the public funding for science. They require money, manpower and a lot of paperwork, changing the way scientists are dealing with experiments. I have to be clear: these experiments are useful and enable to develop a lot of spin-off technologies. The problem is that small or medium-sized experiments are cancelled because of the resulting lack of funding. And believe me, there are a lot of things to learn from room-sized or table-sized testbed. Actually, it is even the only way to keep the contact with reality.

If most institutes or labs start to give up the work on this type of old-fashioned experiments, it can be an opportunity for citizen science. The idea would be to have hackerlabs dedicated to one or several experiments, with access for everybody, just like a hackerspace. You go there to learn how to build a testbed, to carry out experiment, to imagine new experiments. All this with the support of a team of professional experimenters and access to a full-fledged workshop.

What do you gain with respect to a classical lab?  First, independence and flexibility: you choose your hackerlab, your experiment, your objectives, your agenda. Second, you keep hands on real stuff: you learn why experimenting is hard: why it is not enough to push a button to get ready-to-use nobel prize-graded results. Third, you can use as template the structure of the maker world, inclusive the communication system, to present your experiments, your results. You can even imagine a remote control of your testbed, creating your plasma discharge from your bed (I used to trigger my digitizers from the seashore, the best place to think).

And you would not have to justify in advance the choice of every technology you use (“because it’s fun” has always been a bad justification in the academic world). Finally, a good place to use Google Glasses integrated to your experimental process!

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